Tickets Now on Sale for East Bay State of Mind ft. Luvvie Ajayi

By Jonathan Bash January 17, 2018

Community connections are a core part of how Rubicon works to achieve its mission because we know that no one person or organization can break this cycle alone. It takes many collaborators -- our participants, staff, and you. East Bay State of Mind is an opportunity to treat yourself, and your guests, to a fun and inspiring evening in support of Rubicon’s vision of an East Bay without poverty.

BUY TICKETS NOW

Thursday, April 12, 2018
Scottish Rite Center map
Oakland, CA 

6:00pm - Doors open + cocktail hour
6:30pm - Fireside chat with Luvvie // The Power of Social Media for Good
7:30pm - Dinner + Values Awards Ceremony // Keynote by Luvvie; Inspiration by Rubicon
8:45pm - Book signing
9:00pm - After party hosted by Rubicon’s Young Professionals Board

OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS

Corporate Sponsors

 

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Individual Sponsors

Ilana DeBare & Sam Schuchat                Dana DuFrane           Paul Leonard       

Claire Levay-Young                                  Sophia Loh                Ereca MIller & John Shrewsberry           

Karen Norwood                                        Scott L. Poland          Mary Purcell                                             

UPS                                                          Travis Credit Union    Michael Wade        

 

Special Thanks & In-Kind Donors

Black Sands                                             Cream Oakland                  Dashe Cellars

Drake's Brewing Company                      East Brother Beer Co.        Faction Brewery

Fort Point Beer Co.                                 Golden State Warriors        Lagunitas Brewing Company

New Parkway Theater                            Oakland A's                        Oaktown Spice Shop

Old kan Beer                                           Punchdown Cellars            Scribe Winery

Two Mile

 

Corporate Event Partners

Charles Schwab Foundation

​Heffernan Insurance Brokers

First Republic Bank

 

About Our Values Awardees

This year, we're doing something special: celebrating the community leaders who made real change happen, all while demonstrating our core values of hope, humility and justice for all. 

Our first annual Values Awards will be given by Rubicon Programs and our partners, the Asian Prisoners Support Committee and the Safe Return Project, at East Bay State of Mind on April 12, and will spotlight the remarkable advocates who passed A.B. 1008, the "Ban the Box" Fair Chance Hiring Act.

  • All of Us or None
  • Legal Services for Prisoners with Children
  • National Employment Law Project
  • Time for Change Foundation

and​

  • State Legislative Leaders
  • State Senator Bill Dodd
  • State Senator Steve Glazer
  • State Senator Nancy Skinner
  • State Senator Bob Wieckowski
  • Assemblymember Kansen Chu
  • Assemblymember Ron Bonta
  • Assemblymember Kevin McCarty
  • Assemblymember Bill Quirk 
  • Assemblymember Tony Thurmond

About keynote speaker
Luvvie Ajayi

Luvvie Ajayi is a New York Times-bestselling author, speaker and digital strategist who thrives at the intersection of comedy, technology, and activism. A 15-year blogging veteran, she is the voice behind Awesomely Luvvie, a widely-respected humor blog that covers everything pop culture – from TV, movies and technology to travel, race and life’s random adventures. Her first book, I’M JUDGING YOU: The Do Better Manual, was released in September 2016 and became an instant best seller. The book was recently re-released in hardcover with a bonus chapter and is currently being developed into a series for television.

Additionally, Luvvie is a sought-after speaker and her cultural criticism, analysis and expertise have taken her all over the world, from the White House to various corporations and stages around the globe (Haiti, Egypt, Nigeria, South Africa, Barbados and Kenya). She has been a keynote speaker at numerous colleges, conferences, festivals (including SXSW and BlogHer) and at companies such as Facebook, Amazon, and Twitter.

Luvvie is also the executive director of The Red Pump Project, a national nonprofit that raises awareness about the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls using red shoes as a symbol of empowerment. She is an avid traveler and her love language is shoes

Sponsorship Opportunities

Sponsorship of East Bay State of Mind connects your business or organization with people who are passionate about creating an equitable East Bay for all. We offer sponsorship packages for both business and individuals. 

View our sponsorship packages:

Corporate Sponsorship >>

Individual Sponsorship >>

Complete your sponsorship online

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#TogetherWeRise

By Jonathan Bash October 27, 2017


Rubicon Programs transforms East Bay communities by equipping people to break the cycle of poverty. 

We believe that no one service is enough to end intergenerational poverty. People are complicated. They can't be reduced to the least common denominator. 

That's why we provide our participants with three years of coaching and opportunities across four core service areas: income, assets, wellness and connections.
 
First, we help our participants get a job and map a long-term career plan. Then, we show them how to grow their savings, build their credit, set a budget and overcome legal barriers. 
 
But we don't stop with these simple economic solutions. 

Physical and emotional health issues, and limited social networks, also keep people in poverty. That's why we offer tailored wellness services and assistance establishing the community networks necessary to build a career, raise a family, and make positive change.

This holistic, flexible approach allows us to end poverty permanently for more than 1,700 people each year. And we all benefit.

Help us build an East Bay without poverty.

Click here to support others like Mario, Angela and John:

"Thanks to Rubicon, I’ve overcome some serious obstacles. All the workshops – and all the coaches – challenged me and helped me grow, allowing me to use my community connections to get a good job." - Mario

"To look at where I am now is a delightful feeling. I was running from my credit for so long, but now I just want to see it grow." - Angela

"I had headaches and didn’t know why. Now, thanks to Rubicon, I know it's hypertension and I’m able to make it better. Rubicon connected me with everything I needed." - John

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East Bay Times Op-Ed: AB 1250 is a vivid lesson in unintended consequences

By Jonathan Bash August 31, 2017

BY JANE FISCHBERG & DAN GEIGER

August 31, 2017

In government, good intentions frequently have unintended consequences. Unfortunately, many of these unintended consequences can have irreversible impacts, costing lives, chilling innovation and disintegrating community institutions that have reliably served our neighbors for decades.

That’s the case with AB 1250. This legislation has a purportedly noble goal: to protect employment security for public employees.  But in actuality, it constructs an elaborate system that locks out the nonprofits and medical specialists that ensure that some of our community’s most vulnerable residents receive care.

The bill would require all county contractors — many of whom are nonprofit Community Benefit Organizations (CBOs) — to spend a significant portion of their modest budgets on expensive audits, burdensome paperwork and administrative overhead.

In the short run, this would divert critical resources from vital services.

In the long run, it could force hundreds of community organizations to shut their doors, leaving tens of thousands of people with limited resources — including survivors of domestic violence, those living with mental illness and families who are homeless — out in the cold.

Almost 65 percent of Contra Costa County’s mental health services are contracted out to provide much-needed additional capacity to the county’s health delivery system. Partnerships between these organizations and the Health Services Department ensure that residents benefit from the cultural responsiveness, expertise and skill they have to offer, while remaining flexible enough to continually innovate and improve their practices.

Outside contracting is particularly necessary in situations where labor is scarce and few people have hyper-specialized expertise. If a disease is relatively rare, why have the county hospital hire a full-time doctor just to serve a handful of people? It makes much more economic sense for a few counties to contract one shared doctor to serve an entire region.

AB 1250 would make it cost prohibitive for a doctor or health group to choose that arrangement. On top of that, there are many emergency services that must be contracted out to protect public safety. The simple truth is that no health department can employ enough professionals to staff and manage the entire system on its own.

Other organizations, such as Rubicon Programs in the counties of Contra Costa and Alameda, deliver services that help the unemployed find jobs. Due to its nonprofit status, Rubicon is able to pool varying sources of funding to maximize its impact. It also can build close, active partnerships between local businesses and community groups, allowing them to develop comprehensive supports that help individuals find a job, establish a career and achieve economic mobility. This holistic, hands-on approach is not one that a government agency could manage effectively.

It all comes down to this: AB 1250 is an existential threat to our local health care delivery systems. It’s a one-size-fits-all policy that solves no real problems and creates new ones.

The 21 members of the Human Services Alliance of Contra Costa – in partnership with the county – serve more than 360,000 residents. Millions more are served in Alameda, San Francisco and across the state. These organizations already face potential cutbacks instituted by the federal government. They cannot afford to further jeopardize their ability to provide high-quality services.

No one wins when you decrease quality and access to services.

We urge you to contact your State Sens. Nancy Skinner, Bob Wieckowski, Bill Dodd and Steve Glazer. Ask them to vote no on AB 1250.

Dan Geiger is the director of the Human Services Alliance of Contra Costa. Jane Fischberg is the president and CEO of Rubicon Programs, a nonprofit serving Contra Costa and Alameda counties. 

Read the original op-ed at www.eastbaytimes.com.

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Rubicon Programs Partners with Travis Credit Union To Help Contra Costa ‘Crave 2 Save’

By Jonathan Bash August 15, 2017

47 Percent of All Americans Have Less Than $400 in Their Savings Account 

 

RICHMOND, CALIF., AUGUST 15, 2017 … In an effort to bring financial stability to Contra Costa County’s low-income residents, Rubicon Programs, a nonprofit fighting poverty in the East Bay, Sparkpoint Contra Costa and Travis Credit Union have partnered to launch their new “Crave 2 Save” challenge for Contra Costa County residents.

“At Rubicon, our job is to support our community in building financial, social and human capital,” said Jane Fischberg, President and CEO of Rubicon Programs. “You can’t break the cycle of poverty without saving for the unexpected. For many families, one car repair or dental emergency can be the difference between economic stability and debilitating debt.”

A savings account can save much more than money. 47 percent of all Americans have less than $400 in their savings account and are unprepared for life’s emergencies. Without a savings account, many people must turn to high-interest payday advance loans and credit cards for relief. The small debt eventually balloons to be unmanageable thanks to outrageous 450 percent APRs.

“Travis Credit Union exists to create value in the communities we serve and we believe a family’s ability to save for their future is the foundation of financial success,” said Barry Nelson, President and CEO of Travis Credit Union. “Through the Crave 2 Save program with partners like Rubicon we will break the cycle of poverty.”

So what’s the challenge? Eight nonprofits in four counties across the Bay Area will compete to enroll as many people into savings accounts as possible by December 31, 2017. The two nonprofits from the winning county will split a $75,000 prize that will fund each of the organization’s work to end the cycle of poverty.

To earn points for the two nonprofits, Crave 2 Save participants must open a free new Travis Credit Union savings account, mention the Crave2Save Challenge using the tracking code “CCC1,” meet savings targets that add up to $400, and attend a free financial education seminar. All participants will be entered to win a $100 giveaway at their local branch.

For more information on Crave 2 Save, visit www.traviscu.org/crave2save or call Rubicon Programs at 510-412-1725.

Rubicon Programs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit whose mission is to transform East Bay communities by equipping people to break the cycle of poverty. The organization serves the people of Contra Costa and Alameda counties, and provides services that help low-income individuals enter the workforce and develop fulfilling lives.

Travis Credit Union, headquartered in Vacaville, California, is a not-for-profit cooperative financial institution serving those who live or work in Alameda, Colusa, Contra Costa, Merced Napa, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, and Yolo Counties. Currently, Travis Credit Union is the 14th largest credit union in California with more than 189,000 members and more than $2.8 billion in assets. As one of the leading financial institutions in Solano, Contra Costa, Yolo and Merced Counties, Travis Credit Union’s strength lies in its faithful commitment to its members and the community; its solid, secure history; and its long-standing track record of dedicated service.  

CONTACT: Jonathan Bash  |  jonathanb@rubiconprograms.org |  (510) 231-3993  

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Rubicon Stands with Charlottesville Victims, Against Hate and for a Growing Movement

By Jane Fischberg August 14, 2017

It is our collective responsibility to call out and dismantle injustice and inequity in our fractured system when we see it.  Rubicon Programs remains committed to acting on our responsibility to represent the people we serve and fight for their interests – and what we agree is basic human decency.

I would like to share with you my personal experience and reflections on this past weekend’s blatant show of armed Nazism, white supremacy and unfettered fascism in Charlottesville, and the death and violence that followed.  Frankly, I was horrified and angry.

Last night’s vigils sprang up organically throughout the country, with at least a few right here in the East Bay.  Personally, I attended a gathering in Latham Square in Oakland. So many thoughts ran through my mind. 

People from the ages of 15 to 90 spoke from the heart, and many families brought their young children.  I found high school age speakers to be especially eloquent, expressing both their resolve to be united against hate wherever they see it, and also their hope for the future.

On the other end of the age continuum, someone who attended a vigil in El Cerrito told me about a 93-year-old man who spoke. The man said that he had fought at Iwo Jima, and never thought he would still be struggling against fascism more than 70 years later. He didn’t want to die with the struggle still continuing. 

My friend made a sign, “400,000 US military died fighting fascism during World War II.  Never again.” 

White supremacy is a disease, as well as a system, and it remains a threat.

I then wondered if this immediate and widespread outpouring of anger, grief and dismay by white people was, in part, due to the fact that a white life was lost. Would the national response have been the same if Heather Heyer were black or brown?

Toward the end of the vigil, Oscar Grant’s uncle spoke, introducing himself as Uncle Bobby, and asked how many of us at the vigil had been there eight years before, when his unarmed nephew was shot dead by a BART police officer.

I was one of those who was not.  Only about a quarter of the crowd raised their hands.  

Nonetheless, he found comfort in this, and did not express bitterness. He took this as a sign of advancement. The number of people who are aware of the deep, gnarled roots of systemic racism in America has multiplied exponentially. People are talking about it and acting to end it.

Unfortunately, our nation still has a ways to go. Hundreds of white men are still marching with swastikas on their arms and torches in their hands. Our President remains silent. And more complicated issues like poverty and implicit bias remain ever-present.

We should hold onto Uncle Bobby’s words and embrace his message of hope.

The nation is awakening.  Let’s shine a light on injustice and fight for change one heart and mind at a time.

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